Tools for data visualization

Creating infographics can be time-consuming. But these tools make it easier.

It’s often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it’s traded. As consumers, we’re positively swimming in data; it’s everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it’s becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams.

One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it’s also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn’t be apparent from looking at stats alone.

1. Excel

excel

You can actually do some pretty complex things with Excel, from ‘heat maps’ of cells to scatter plots. As an entry-level tool, it can be a good way of quickly exploring data, or creating visualizations for internal use, but the limited default set of colours, lines and styles make it difficult to create graphics that would be usable in a professional publication or website. Nevertheless, as a means of rapidly communicating ideas, Excel should be part of your toolbox.

2. Tableau

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Tableau Desktop is data analysis that keeps up with you. It’s easy to learn, easy to use, and 10-100x faster than existing solutions. It’s built on breakthrough technology that translates pictures of data into optimized database queries. Use your natural ability to see patterns, identify trends and discover visual insights in seconds. No wizards, no scripts.

3. R

R

How many other pieces of software have an entire search engine dedicated to them? A statistical package used to parse large data sets, R is a very complex tool, and one that takes a while to understand, but has a strong community and package library, with more and more being produced.

4. jpGraph

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If you need to generate charts and graphs server-side, jpGraph offers a PHP-based solution with a wide range of chart types. It’s free for non-commercial use, and features extensive documentation. By rendering on the server, this is guaranteed to provide a consistent visual output, albeit at the expense of interactivity and accessibility.

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